Thursday, December 23, 2010

Crap Beer

Order Mikkeller online

Back in stock VERY RARE!!
Mikkeller Beer Geek Brunch Weasel...$13.99 / pint

10.9%
Rated 100 percentile on RateBeer
Rated A on BeerAdvocate

"This imperial Oatmeal stout is brewed with one of the world’s most expensive coffees, made from droppings of weasel-like civet cats. The fussy Southeast Asian animals only eat the best and ripest coffee berries. Enzymes in their digestive system help to break down the bean. Workers collect the bean-containing droppings for Civet or Weasel Coffee. The exceedingly rare Civet Coffee has a strong taste and an even stronger aroma.
Ingredients :Water, malts, hops, yeast and Vietnamese ca phe chon coffee." -- Mikkeller




"Beer Geek Brunch from Mikkeller is the highest rated Danish beer at RateBeer.com. And with the massive media coverage up to its release in early January, demand has obviously been much higher than supply. Beer Geek Brunch is in other words almost sold out. So Mikkel is getting ready for making the next batch Beer Geek Brunch in Norway. And a huge consignment of Ca Pe Chon coffee should also be on its way. On the picture you can see Rob with a weasel-poo full of the coffee beans that are giving Beer Geek Brunch its unique taste." -- Mikkeller



"So what is special about this particular big beer (10+ % ABV)? “Shit coffee.” Here is a post from Wikipedia all about Kopi Luwak, a.k.a. Civet coffee, a.k.a. the most expensive coffee in the world. And here is the animal coffee that they are using.
“Civet coffee is coffee made from coffee berries which have been eaten by and passed through the digestive tract of the Asian Palm Civet [...] The inner bean of the berry is not digested, but it has been proposed that enzymes in the stomach of the civet add to the coffee’s flavor by breaking down the proteins that give coffee its bitter taste. The beans are defecated still covered in some inner layers of the berry. The beans are washed, and given only a light roast so as to not destroy the complex flavors that develop through the process.” - http://www.beernews.org/




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